What do successor trustees and executors do?

What do successor trustees and executors do?

An executor, sometimes called a personal representative, is the person who is named in a will, appointed by the court, and responsible for probating the will and settling the estate. A trustee, on the other hand, is an individual or trust company named in a trust document and is in charge of the assets that are held in a trust. Assets held in a living trust avoid probate, which means that court supervision is typically not required.

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After Tax Reform, Is Estate Planning Still Necessary?

After Tax Reform, Is Estate Planning Still Necessary?

The new tax legislation raises the federal estate tax exemption to $11.2 million for individuals and $22.4 million for couples. The increase means that an exceedingly small number of estates (only about 1,800, nationally) will have to worry about federal estate taxes in 2018. However, comprehensive estate planning does a lot more than guard against you owing federal estate taxes. Other than taxes, you and your family likely face a range of estate planning challenges. Even prior to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, relatively few Americans needed to worry about the estate tax. However, virtually everyone will face a number of other issues, such as incapacity, medical emergences and guardianship concerns and everyone will face death. Estate Planning is very important and I look forward to giving you the peace of mind you deserve.

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Are Payable-On-Death Accounts Right For You?

Are Payable-On-Death Accounts Right For You?

A payable-on-death account, also called a POD account, is a common way to keep bank and investment accounts out of probate, the court-supervised process that oversees distributing a deceased person’s property. Most people want to avoid their estate going through probate because their heirs will receive the inheritance faster, privately, and at lower cost. Is a POD account an appropriate solution for your needs?

There are many downsides to a POD account and a there is a better solution that is more comprehensive. Here’s a comprehensive solution: establish a revocable living trust to hold your accounts. Trusts provide all the benefits and peace of mind of a POD account without any of the downsides.

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4 Warning Signs Your Elderly Relative May Be the Victim of Financial Abuse

4 Warning Signs Your Elderly Relative May Be the Victim of Financial Abuse

Some of the most disturbing crimes against the elderly involve financial exploitation. While physical abuse is often easy to spot, financial abuse can be more difficult to detect, as victims often have no idea they’re being swindled until their money suddenly vanishes.

Most victims are more than 70 or 80 years old, and involve crimes like fraud, embezzlement, identity theft, along with welfare and insurance scams. If you’re caring for an elderly loved one, be on the lookout for the following red flags of financial abuse: 1) unusual financial transactions or spending, 2) appearance of a “new” person, 3) unneeded goods, services or subscriptions, and 4) changes to estate planning documents.

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IRAs, Annuities and Guardianship: Providing for Your Minor Children after You Die

IRAs, Annuities and Guardianship: Providing for Your Minor Children after You Die

Deciding guardianship for your minor children may very well be the most vexing decision you’ll make regarding your estate planning. Not only must you trust the appointed guardian to raise your children as you’d want them raised, but you also need that person to be financially responsible with your children’s inheritance. For example, if you have an IRA or an annuity that you wish to pass to your minor children, how can you ensure those funds will be used properly—especially if the person you trust most to raise your kids isn’t necessarily the best with finances? This article will unravel each aspect of this important question.

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