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The Cost of Misclassifying Employees as Independent Contractors

The Cost of Misclassifying Employees as Independent Contractors

The rise of the “gig economy” has led to a dramatic increase in the number of businesses using independent contractors (IC) instead of traditional W2 employees. At the same time, there’s been a sharp rise in the number of companies being penalized and/or sued for misclassifying workers as ICs.

Indeed, within the past 10 years, there’s been heightened scrutiny from regulatory agencies at all levels and numerous lawsuits filed over the issue. These lawsuits have forced companies like FedEx, Uber, and Citigroup to pay out hundreds of millions of dollars to those they’ve misclassified.

State-level studies show that between 10 and 20 percent of employers misclassify at least one employee as an IC, and you can be penalized regardless of whether or not you did it intentionally. Given this, you should carefully scrutinize all of your workers and have the proper contracts in place to shield your business. Fortunately, with legal guidance from me, you can easily avoid these risks and stay totally compliant.

However, since you can save an estimated 20 to 40 percent on labor costs by not contributing to a worker’s Social Security, Medicare, and other benefits, you may be tempted to take your chances and pass off some of your employees as ICs. But in doing so, you’re risking serious consequences, which have the potential to destroy your business.

Getting busted
It’s easy for the IRS to be alerted to a potential misclassification. A worker can file an SS-8 form, alleging you’re in violation of the law, or he or she might simply receive a 1099 and W-2 in the same year. Beyond that, you can also get caught if a worker tries to claim unemployment or disability, as this results in an audit of your business.

Plus, because there’s no single test to determine a worker’s classification, it can be easy to misclassify a worker by mistake. And regardless of whether or not the misclassification was intentional, if the allegation proves valid, you’re potentially on the hook for paying back taxes, benefits, and numerous fines.

Fines, Back Payments, and Penalties
If you misclassify an employee, you face fines from the U.S. Department of Labor, IRS, and state agencies that can total millions of dollars. Moreover, you can be held responsible for paying back-taxes and interest on employee wages, along with FICA taxes that weren’t originally withheld. Failure to make these payments can result in additional fines.

You can also be held liable for failing to pay overtime and minimum wage under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act as well as under state laws. Such claims can go back as far as three years if it’s found you knowingly made the misclassification.

If the IRS believes your misclassification was intentional, there’s also the possibility of criminal and civil penalties. Additional penalties and fines can be assessed depending on the severity of your misclassification.

Back benefits and a tarnished reputation
Outside of the fines paid to state and federal agencies, if an employee is misclassified, they’re eligible to claim employee benefits he or she missed out on. These can include healthcare coverage, stock options, 401(k) matches, PTO, and even unpaid break time.

Don’t Take The Chance
’With such severe consequences, it’s simply not worth taking the chance of misclassifying your workers. To this end, you should consult with me to make sure you have all of your bases covered.

Whether you need help reviewing your IC classification practices or would like assistance with creating sound employment contracts, I can be of service to you. Contact my office at (858) 432-3923 to get started.

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I’m Starting a New Business – Should I Use an LLC (Taxed as a Partnership) or an S Corporation?

I’m Starting a New Business – Should I Use an LLC (Taxed as a Partnership) or an S Corporation?

Entrepreneurship has been called the new American dream.  Being self-employed starts with an idea that develops into a business plan, but not without careful financial and legal considerations. Among the decisions that new business owners grapple with is whether to form a limited liability company taxed as a partnership (LLC) or a corporation making an S election (S corp).* There are similarities and differences between LLCs and S corps that business owners should understand before choosing between the two.

Similarities

  • Both entities are created by filing the necessary paperwork with the state. Unlike a sole proprietorship or a general partnership, LLCs and corporations are not recognized under state law until the filing has been made. In addition to state filings required to form the corporation, a special filing on Form 2553 is required for the state-law corporation to elect S status for federal tax purposes.
  • Both entities provide owners with limited liability, meaning the owner’s personal assets are protected from any business creditors’ claims.
  • Assuming an LLC does not make an election to be taxed as a corporation, both LLCs and S corps are pass-through tax entities, allowing business profits and losses to flow through and be reported on the owners’ personal tax returns.

Differences

  • Unlike LLCs, which can have an unlimited number and type of owners, S corps are subject to strict ownership rules. S corps can have no more than 100 shareholders, may not have non-U.S. citizens as shareholders, and cannot be owned by corporations, LLCs, partnerships, or many types of trusts.
  • As opposed to LLCs, which have flexibility in structuring the economic arrangement among its owners, S corps cannot issue classes of stock with different economic rights. However, an S corp can issue voting and non-voting classes of stock.
  • S corps are subject to mandatory requirements as to how the entity is managed. For example, S corps are often required to adopt bylaws, issue stock, hold regular meetings, and maintain meeting minutes within its corporate records. LLCs, on the other hand, are not subject to these types of requirements.
  • Owners of S corps, unlike LLCs, may be able to reduce or eliminate the need to pay self-employment tax. An S corp owner can be treated as an employee and paid a reasonable salary. Employment taxes are withheld from the reasonable salary, while corporate earnings in excess of that salary may be distributed to the owners as unearned income, free of self-employment tax.
  • S corp owners must share profits equally based on their percentage of ownership, while LLC owners have wide latitude to split profits and losses in any manner that is agreed upon.
  • LLCs are generally cheaper to form and operate.
  • S corps generally provide enhanced asset protection, as the structure creates more separation between the owners and the company.

*For the sake of simplicity, this brief overview is based on the assumption that (i) any reference to “LLC” is to an LLC taxed as a partnership, and (ii) any reference to “S corp” is to a corporation taxed as an S corporation. These entities are easily confused, in part because an LLC can make an S election. In that case, you have a state law LLC taxed as an S corporation under federal law. Why would anyone choose to do that? In many cases, it is the business owner’s desire to avoid strict state law corporate compliance coupled with the desire for favorable S corp taxation.

Each business has its own set of circumstance to consider and it is important to obtain competent legal advice when staring your own business.  I am here to discuss how to properly structure, form, and protect your business. Please give me a call at (858) 432-3923 to schedule a consultation.

 

 

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Big “Life Changes” Often Mean Big “Estate Plan Changes”

Big “Life Changes” Often Mean Big “Estate Plan Changes”

Many people who put together an estate plan do so when they start a family – assuming they put an estate plan together at all during their lifetime. While putting an estate plan together is a good thing to do, many people make few updates once the plan has been created, despite other key life events happening over the years. This is a major mistake that can place your hard-earned money and assets into a costly probate or into the wrong hands.

Estate planning must be reviewed and updated regularly to ensure that your plan still accomplishes your goals and objectives and will work the way you want it to at incapacity and at death.

To make sure you do not run into these issues and your wishes are followed in the event of your incapacity at at your death, below are nine life decisions or events that should get you thinking about updating — or creating — your estate plan right away.

Important Life Decisions

There are several important life decisions that you should factor into your estate plan. They include:

  1. Getting married: Estate planning after tying the knot does not have to be complicated. Simply updating your beneficiary information, purchasing a life insurance policy, and updating emergency contact information are all things that should happen right away. You should also consider preparing a will and a living will. As your marriage progresses, it may make sense to consider a revocable trust as well. Having discussions with your spouse about how you want your estate to be managed depending on different scenarios is also important.
  2. Getting divorced: While couples do not plan for divorce, many spouses go through this process. For many, the emotional toll and legal complexities of divorce can be overwhelming. Oftentimes estate planning is overshadowed by the divorce, resulting in unintended consequences. Making sure you make changes to your estate plan as soon as your divorce proceedings have been finalized will make sure your ex will not end up with the house, life insurance proceeds or other assets of yours.
  3. Buying life insurance: These policies are present in virtually all estate plans and serve as a useful source of liquidity, education-expense coverage, and financial support for your family or loved ones. Make sure to list all beneficiaries under the policy and make sure to update them as time passes.
  4. Buying a new home: When you purchase or refinance a home or other real estate, you should always make sure the asset is titled appropriately. If you use a trust, sometimes a lender will take a property out of a trust during a refinance. The key is to make sure your title furthers your goals.
  5. Having a child: While adding another member to your family is an exciting time in your life, it is not an excuse to forget to update your estate plan. A new child necessitates major revisions to your estate plan. This not only affects who will inherit your estate upon your death but will also require you deciding who will be the guardian of your children if you should die before they become adults. As your child grows and matures — and more children are added — your estate plan will likely continue to change.
  6. Starting a business: If you start a business or ownership interest changes in a current business, you need to understand what impact these changes have on your estate plan. Even more, there may be tax implications that could affect your heirs without proper planning ahead of time.
  7. Death of a loved one: The passing away of someone listed in your will is often overlooked in estate planning. These individuals may be named guardians to your children, have an inheritance allocated to them, be designated as emergency contacts, or may be named as executors of your estate. Leaving the role vacant can have terrible unintended consequences and necessitates transitioning new people to fill the void left behind by your loved one’s death right away.
  8. Moving to another state or country: When you change your residency from one state to another, you must review your estate plan to make sure it conforms with local laws. The same is true if you move to another country. Likewise, if you have property in more than one state or country, special attention must be paid to how those assets will be distributed according to your estate plan and applicable law.
  9. Change in work benefits: Whether this happened through a promotion, demotion, or your employer just changed the benefits they offer, this could impact the type amount of assets you have available. Look at your estate plan to see if your goals are still achievable or if you can do more with what you have.

Estate Planning Advice

Planning based on your life stages is important because your circumstances over the years will change. The only thing certain in life is change. Your estate plan must be reviewed and updated regularly to reflect your life’s changes. If you have any questions about estate planning — or have had to make a recent big decision in your life — contact me at (858) 432-3923 to learn more about your options.

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How to Choose a Trustee

How to Choose a Trustee

When you establish a Trust, you name someone to be the Trustee. Generally, you are the Initial Trustee for your Revocable Living Trust.  A Successor Trustee steps in your shoes in the event of your incapacity and at your death.  That person does what you do right now with your financial affairs – collect income, pay bills and taxes, save and invest for the future, buy and sell assets, provide for your loved ones, keep accurate records, and generally keep things organized and in good order.

The Key Takeaways

  • You can be Trustee of your Revocable Living Trust. If you are married, your spouse can be co-Trustee.
  • Most Irrevocable Trusts do not allow you to be Trustee.
  • Even though you may be allowed to be your own Trustee, you may not be the best choice.
  • You can also choose an adult child, trusted friend or a professional or corporate Trustee.
  • Naming someone else to be co-Trustee with you is an option should the circumstances call for it.  Some reasons for this include helping them become familiar with your trust, allows them to learn firsthand how you want the trust to operate, and lets you evaluate the co-Trustee’s abilities.

Who Can Be Your Trustee

If you have a Revocable Living Trust, you can be your own Trustee. If you are married, your spouse can be a Trustee with you. This way, if either of you become incapacitated or die, the other can continue to handle your financial affairs without interruption. Most married couples who own assets together, especially those who have been married for some time, are usually co-Trustees.

You don’t have to be your own Trustee. Some people choose an adult son or daughter, a trusted friend or another relative. Some like having the experience and investment skills of a professional or corporate trustee (e.g., a licensed private Professional Fiduciary, a bank Trust department or Trust Company). Naming someone else as Trustee or co-Trustee with you does not mean you lose control. The Trustee you name must follow the instructions in your Trust and report to you. You can even replace your Trustee should you change your mind.

When to Consider a Professional or Corporate Trustee

You may be elderly, widowed, or in declining health and have no children or other trusted relatives living nearby.  Or you may not have friends or family that you fully trust for this important duty.  Or your candidates may not have the time or ability to manage your trust. You may simply not have the time, desire or experience to manage your investments by yourself. Also, certain Irrevocable Trusts will not allow you to be Trustee due to restrictions in the tax laws. In these situations, a professional or corporate trustee may be exactly what you need: they have the experience, time and resources to manage your trust and help you meet your investment goals.

What You Need to Know

Professional or corporate trustees will charge a fee to manage your trust, but generally the fee is quite reasonable, especially when you consider their experience, the services provided, and the investment returns that a professional Trustee can deliver.

Actions to Consider

  • Honestly evaluate if you are the best choice to be your own Trustee. Someone else may truly do a better job than you, especially in investing your assets.
  • Name someone to be co-Trustee with you now. This would eliminate the time a successor would need to become knowledgeable about your trust, your assets, and the needs and personalities of your beneficiaries. It would also let you evaluate if the co-Trustee is the right choice to manage the Trust in your absence.
  • Evaluate your Trustee candidates carefully and realistically.
  • If you are considering a Professional or Corporate Trustee, talk to several. Compare their services, investment returns, and fees.  I have a couple I highly recommend, which will give you a nice starting place.

I can help you select, educate, and advise your Successor Trustees so they will have support and know what to do next to carry out your wishes. Give me a call at 858-432-3923 and I will be happy to serve you.

 

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