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“I Love You” Wills don’t really say “I Love You”

“I Love You” Wills don’t really say “I Love You”

Here, I’m going to discuss the drawbacks of “I love you” wills and introduce you to the estate planning move that’s actually going to ensure you do well by your loved ones: a lifetime beneficiary trust.

Rise above the misconceptions

No aspect of estate planning brings out as much emotional decision-making as the division of assets. Many people think, “I love you,” so I’ll leave you everything. In order to understand why “I love you” wills are, contrary to their name, not the most caring of estate planning gestures, it’s important to understand the risks of “I love you” wills.

Simply, an “I love you” will is a common name for a will in which the Grantor leaves all of his or her assets outright to his or her surviving spouse.  Many people consider or even use this approach because they think that leaving assets in trust shows they don’t trust their spouse. They may also think that a lack of federal estate taxes protects their assets from getting into the wrong hands. Sadly, many people also think that a will can be used to avoid probate. Unfortunately, none of these things are true.

Understand why “I love you” wills aren’t effective 

Let’s assume for a moment that you want to ensure your spouse gets access to your wealth upon your death.  If all you have completed is a simple “I Love You” will, your spouse (or whomever you designated as your Personal Representative) will have to open a court proceeding, called, Probate, in order to validate your will and transfer your assets.  Depending on how your will was written, your Personal Representative may have to post bond.  Obtaining a Bond requires credit worthiness so if your Personal Representative has a credit problem, the Court may not allow that person to act and will appoint a Professional Fiduciary to act as your Personal Representative if a successor was not named.  In such case, that Personal Representative may not act according to what you had ultimately wanted if it wasn’t spelled out.

Once your spouse receives the assets, which could take years in the Probate Court, the assets are distributed outright.  An outright distribution of assets has many disadvantages, which are listed below.  With your spouse holding all of the assets outright, his/her estate plan will eventually control the distribution of whatever assets are left at her death – assuming proper estate planning was done, otherwise, an additional probate would be opened at his/her death.  If estate planning was completed, s/he has the right to alter his/her plan at any time and any verbal agreements that you two may have had are not enforceable and your wealth may end up in the hands of someone else, rather than your children or other beneficiaries.

Disadvantages of outright distributions include:

  • You could inadvertently disinherit your children. If you use an “I love you” will, your assets are now in your spouse’s hands for him/her to leave however s/he wants. For example, your spouse could leave the assets to his/her own kids, a charity, a lover, or a new spouse.  Likewise, assets left outright to children could be lost in a divorce.
  • Basic planning with outright inheritance sets your heirs up for asset protection issues. Once your assets are owned outright by your beneficiaries through a direct inheritance, those assets can be seized by creditors, divorcing spouses, or lost in bankruptcy. Even if your estate is below the exemption for the death tax, predatory creditors and lawsuits could still spell trouble.
  • These wills still have to go through probate. Surviving spouses do not receive an exemption from probate. Even a simple will still has to go through the process, which you may not be anticipating — especially if you had hoped to keep the details of the will private. If you end up in Probate, the matter becomes public record.  Trusts, however, don’t need to go through probate and all of your assets will pass according to the Trust as long as those assets are titled to your Trust.
  • An “I love you” will does not protect against guardianship or conservatorship court involvement for you or for your beneficiaries. For example, if you leave all of your assets to your spouse and s/he develops dementia, the entire estate (existing assets plus the inheritance s/he received from you) could be under the control of a guardianship or conservatorship court.
  • Basic plans pile more assets into survivors’ estates. Although portability between spouses can help, it still doesn’t prove useful with the generation-skipping transfer tax (GSTT). Portability isn’t available for non-spouse beneficiaries. While at this point in time, having a taxable estate affect a very narrow group of people with very high net worth; however, we don’t know yet what will happen with tax policy under the new Trump presidency. In a changing tax policy landscape, keeping yourself as informed as possible is an important tactic for ongoing success.

Explore lifetime beneficiary directed trusts

Comprehensive, trust-based estate planning with lifetime beneficiary trusts is a better option than outright inheritance for surviving spouses, children, grandchildren, or other beneficiaries. If you leave your assets in lifetime beneficiary trusts, you retain control over where assets end up in the long run. Plus, your beneficiaries obtain robust asset protection features that can keep wealth safe from courts, creditors, and divorcing spouses. Your family’s private information can stay out of public record. You can also take advantage of more sophisticated tax planning than you can with a basic will or trust with outright distributions.

With proper planning now, you can focus on enjoying your life without worry about what could happen in the future.  Now that’s something to love and truly expresses “I love you” to your beneficiaries.  Feel free to contact me and I can share some stories about people who neglected to plan and you can let me know if that is something that you want your family to experience.  I look forward to working for your best interests now as well as down the road.

 

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How You Can Build an Estate Plan that Includes Asset Protection

How You Can Build an Estate Plan that Includes Asset Protection

Yes, estate planning has to do with the way a person’s assets will be distributed upon their death; however, that’s only the tip of the iceberg. From smart incapacity planning to diligent probate avoidance, there is a lot that goes into crafting a comprehensive estate plan. One important factor to consider is asset protection.

Asset protection helps protect assets in a legal manner without engaging in the illegal acts of concealment, contempt, fraudulent transfer, tax evasion or bankruptcy fraud. One of the most important things to understand about asset protection is that not much good can come from trying to protect your assets reactively when surprised by situations like bankruptcy or divorce – at that point, it is too late. The only way to take full advantage of estate planning in regards to asset protection is to prepare proactively long before these things ever come to pass.

There are two main types of asset protection:

Asset protection for yourself:

This is the kind that has to be done long in advance of any proceedings that might threaten your assets, such as bankruptcy, divorce, or judgment. As there are many highly-detailed rules and regulations surrounding this type of asset protection, it’s important to seek advice from your estate planning attorney.

Asset protection for your heirs:

This type of asset protection involves setting up discretionary lifetime trusts rather than outright inheritance, staggered distributions, mandatory income trusts, or other less protective forms of inheritance. There are varying grades of protection offered by different strategies. For example, a trust that has an independent distribution trustee who is the only person empowered to make discretionary distributions offers much better protection than a trust that allows for “ascertainable standards” distributions. While all of this may sound complex, I am here to help you best protect your heirs and their inheritance.

This complex area of estate planning is full of potential misconceptions, so it’s crucial to obtain qualified advice and not solely rely on common knowledge about what’s possible and what isn’t. As a general outline, let’s take a look at three critical junctures when asset protection can help, along with the estate planning strategies we can build together that can set you up for success.

Bankruptcy

It’s entirely possible that you’ll never need asset protection, but it’s much better to be ready for whatever life throws your way. You’ve worked hard to get where you are in life, and just a little strategic planning will help you hold onto what you have so you can live well and eventually pass your estate’s assets on to future beneficiaries. If you experience an unexpected illness or even a large-scale economic recession, you could result in bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy asset protection strategy: Asset protection trusts

Asset protection trusts hold on to more than just liquid cash. You can fund this type of trust with real estate, investments, personal belongings, and more. Due to the nature of trusts, the person controlling those assets will be a trustee of your choosing. Now that the assets within the trust aren’t technically in your possession, they can stay out of creditors’ reach — so long as the trust is irrevocable, properly funded, and operated in accordance with all the asset protection law’s requirements. In fact, asset protections trusts must be formed and funded well in advance of any potential bankruptcy and have numerous initial and ongoing requirements. They are not for everyone, but can be a great fit for the right type of person.

 

Divorce

One of the last things you want to have happen to the nest egg you’ve saved is for your children to lose it in a divorce. In order to make sure your beneficiaries get the parts of your estate that you want to pass onto them — regardless of how their marriage develops — is a discretionary trust.

 Divorce asset protection strategy: Discretionary trusts

When you create a trust, the property it holds doesn’t officially belong to the beneficiary, making trusts a great way to protect assets from a divorce. Discretionary trusts allow for distribution to the beneficiary but do not mandate any distributions. As a result, they can provide access to assets but reduce (or even eliminate) the risk that your child’s inheritance could be seized by a divorcing spouse. There are a number of ways to designate your trustee and beneficiaries, who may be the same person, and, like with many legal issues, there are some other decisions that need to be made. Discretionary trusts, rather than outright distributions, are one of the best ways you can provide robust asset protection for your children.

Family LLCs or partnerships are another way to keep your assets safe in divorce proceedings. Although discretionary trusts are advisable for people across a wide spectrum of financial means, family LLCs or partnership are typically only a good fit for very well-off people.

 

Judgment

When an upset customer or employee sues a company, the business owner’s personal assets can be threatened by the lawsuit. Even for non-business owners, injury from something as small as a stranger tripping on the sidewalk outside your house can end up draining the wealth you’ve worked so hard for. Although insurance is often the first line of defense, it is often worth exploring other strategies to comprehensively protect against this risk.

Judgment asset protection strategy: Incorporation

Operating your small business as a limited liability company (commonly referred to as an LLC) can help protect your personal assets from business-related lawsuits. As mentioned above, malpractice and other types of liability insurance can also protect you from damaging suits. Risk management using insurance and business entities is a complex discipline, even for small businesses, so don’t only rely on what you’ve heard online or “common sense.” You owe it to your family to work with a group of qualified professionals, including your estate planning attorney and an insurance advisor, to develop a comprehensive asset protection strategy for your business.

 These are just a few ways we can optimize your estate plan in order to keep your assets protected, but every plan should be tailored to an individual’s exact circumstances. Give me a call at 858-432-3923 today to discuss your estate plan’s asset protection strategies.

 

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Embrace the Emotional Side of Estate Planning

Embrace the Emotional Side of Estate Planning

When you hear the phrase “estate plan,” you might first think about paperwork. Or you may focus on some of the uncomfortable topics that estate planning entails: end-of-life decisions, incapacity, and your family’s legacy from generation to generation. Those subjects hit home for everyone.

But while that could feel like a reason to avoid estate planning, the emotional nature of these decisions is actually a reason to embrace the process with enthusiasm. Here are a few ways in which emotion in estate planning is a good thing:

  1. Estate planning creates stability in times of loss

If you end up in a state of incapacity later in life, it’s guaranteed to be a difficult time for your family. If your estate plan doesn’t include detailed instructions for a trusted decision maker and an actionable long-term care plan, it’s guaranteed to be even worse. You can save your loved ones from the confusion about what to do and the pressure to make rushed choices if this occurs, allowing them to save their energy for processing the situation.

  1. Comprehensive estate plans keep emotional matters private

Detailed, trust-based estate planning with lifetime beneficiary directed trusts keeps your private matters out of the public eye. When your estate plan is incomplete — such as a simple will — you’re running the risk of your estate going through court in a proceeding called Probate. This means that choices become visible to the public. Due to notice requirements, Probate can also invite controversy and conflict, which a private transfer would have avoided.

  1. Estate planning can bring a family together

Everyone has heard of a situation in which siblings argued over what their parents left them as beneficiaries. But the opposite is also quite true. When you get your family and other loved ones involved in your estate planning process, you gain a wonderful opportunity to show them how much you care. Creating your estate plan can strengthen the bonds of love in a family and serve as a reminder of those bonds for years to come.

  1. Your estate is about much more than money

 Estate planning is about a whole lot more than just wealth distribution and taxes. During an estate planning session, we can talk about significant family heirlooms, your hard-won hobby collection, and other matters totally unique to your life. We can even look into the memories and intellectual property you want to make sure your beneficiaries receive, such as photos, art, and even recorded videos or audio files of family stories you’d like to share with future generations.

  1. An estate plan means you’re not going it alone

 You shouldn’t have to face trying times alone. Whether the estate in question is yours or a loved one’s, I, as an Estate Planning Attorney can provide you support. I can help educate your appointed agents about their duties so you can know that your family will be in good hands if anything happens to you. The idea of setting everything straight on your own can be a stressful one, but these emotional decisions are much easier to make with a trusted advisor by your side.

I want you to feel ownership and investment in getting your estate plan to reflect you. Estate planning is an opportunity to look at some of life’s big questions and ultimately make sure your family feels your care for them through the choices you make. Give me a call today to see how I can create custom-made solutions that accomplish that goal.

Not Just Death and Taxes: 4 Essential Legal Documents You Need for Incapacity Planning

Not Just Death and Taxes: 4 Essential Legal Documents You Need for Incapacity Planning

Comprehensive estate planning is more than your legacy after death, avoiding probate, and saving on taxes, it must contain incapacity planning.  A proper estate plan includes a plan in place to manage your affairs if you become incapacitated during your life and can no longer make decisions for yourself.

What happens without an incapacity plan?

Without comprehensive incapacity planning in place, your family will have to go to court to get a judge to appoint a guardian or conservator to take control of your assets and health care decisions. This guardian or conservator will make all personal and medical decisions on your behalf as part of a court-supervised guardianship or conservatorship. Until you regain capacity or die, you and your loved ones will be faced with an expensive and time-consuming guardianship or conservatorship proceeding. There are two dimensions to decision making that need to be considered: financial decisions and healthcare decisions.

  • Finances during incapacity

If you are incapacitated, you are legally unable to make financial, investment, or tax decisions for yourself. Of course, bills still need to be paid, tax returns still need to be filed, and investments still need to be managed.

  • Healthcare during incapacity

If you become legally incapacitated, you won’t be able to make healthcare decisions for yourself. Because of patient privacy laws, your loved ones may even be denied access to medical information during a crisis and end up in court fighting over what medical treatment you should, or should not, receive (like Terri Schiavo’s husband and parents did, for 15 years).

You must have these four essential legal documents in place before becoming incapacitated so that your family is empowered to make decisions for you:

  1. Financial power of attorney: This legal document gives your agent the authority to pay bills, make financial decisions, manage investments, file tax returns, mortgage and sell real estate, and address other financial matters that are described in the document.
    • Financial Powers of Attorney come in two forms: “durable” and “springing.” A durable power of attorney goes into effect as soon as it is signed, while a springing power of attorney only goes into effect after you have been declared mentally incapacitated. There are advantages and disadvantages to each type, and we can help you decide which is best for your situation.
  1. Revocable living trust: This legal document has three parties to it: the person who creates the trust (you might see this written as “trustor,” “grantor,” or “settlor” — they all mean the same thing); the person who legally owns and manages the assets transferred into the trust (the “trustee”); and the person who benefits from the assets transferred into the trust (the “beneficiary”). In the typical situation, you will be the trustor, the trustee, and the beneficiary of your own revocable living trust.
    • If you ever become incapacitated, your designated successor trustee will step in to manage the trust assets for your benefit. Since the trust controls how your property is used, you can specify how your assets are to be used if you become incapacitated (for example, you can authorize the trustee to continue to make gifts or pay tuition for your grandchildren).
  2. Advance Health Care Directive: This legal document, sometimes referred to as a healthcare power of attorney, gives your agent the authority to make healthcare decisions and end of life care if you become incapacitated.
  3. HIPAA authorization: This legal document gives your doctor authority to disclose medical information to an agent selected by you. This is important because health privacy laws may make it very difficult for your agents or family to learn about your condition without this release.

Is your incapacity planning up to date?

Once you get all of these legal documents for your incapacity plan in place, you cannot simply stick them in a drawer and forget about them. Instead, your incapacity plan must be reviewed and updated periodically and when certain life events occur such as moving to a new state or going through a divorce. If you keep your incapacity plan up to date and make the documents available to your loved ones and trusted helpers, it should work the way you expect it to if needed.

Should you have any questions or concerns about your incapacity plan, click here. I look forward to hearing from you!